Haldimand 4-H Association members put their skills to the test at annual judging competition

By: Kendra Saxton 

Each year, the Ontario Mutuals Insurance Association gives each 4-H Association the opportunity to apply for a $250 grant to support a local project or program. The Ontario Mutuals Grant Application Program is opened to 4-H Associations in the hopes that the financial support will assist in new project innovations or strengthen and develop an existing program.

One association particularly looking forward to this opportunity is the Haldimand 4-H Association. The association holds an annual judging competition for all of its members, and this year’s event was exceptionally successful. On Monday, June 10, 2019, the Haldimand 4-H Association welcomed its members to the competition, held at the Walpole Antique Farm Machinery Association in Jarvis, Ontario.

This year, over 150 members and 30 screened volunteers, along with additional volunteers and parents practiced their judging techniques and had a blast doing so. The evening began with a pizza dinner accompanied by fresh veggies and chocolate milk, allowing everyone to mingle before the competition started. After dinner, the members judged multiple different categories of objects including classes of lawnmowers, school lunches, sunscreen and bacon, and were asked to give thoughtful reasoning behind their decisions. To ensure that the members could make decisions amongst their peers, they were divided into four groups: novice, junior, intermediate and senior. Everyone had a fun-filled evening despite the weather being a little dreary.

At the conclusion of the judging competition, the members were given well-deserved ice cream treats as they awaited the official placing results. The results were then sent to all the screened volunteers in order to share their success with the rest of their members. The winners of each of the four groups have another event to look forward to in January 2020 in Fisherville, Ontario, as they will be presented with their awards at the Annual Banquet and yearend wrap up. The members of the Haldimand 4-H Association came together for a group photo with the OMIA logo, and received a nod of recognition as the photo was featured in their local newspaper, The Haldimand Press.

The Haldimand 4-H Association sees immense value in this event because it helps their members develop their public speaking and decision-making skills, and provides them with the ability and confidence to explain their reasoning. Hopefully the dedication and passion that the Haldimand 4-H Association shows towards their event will inspire other Associations to consider submitting a project of their own!

 

4-H Club Leaders Help Youth Gain Confidence

Written By: Ryan Métivier

4-H leaders know when youth need that little push to come out of their shells or a change in an activity to help a particular young person reach their potential.

Isabel Miller of Haldimand spent time as a 4-H member when she was a teenager, before making the move to volunteer in 1992, first as a parent volunteer and then as a leader and out of county chaperone. Even after her youngest child graduated as a member in 2006, Isabel has continued volunteering as a leader and a member of the executive committee of Haldimand 4-H Association.

“My belief in the program and the positive impact that it has on youth plays a big role in my involvement,” says Miller.  

Of the many clubs she currently leads, at the very first meeting of her Miniature Horse Club back in 2014, she noticed she had one very shy member in the group. This member hid her face in her mom’s coat sleeve and let her mother answer for her. She also was too shy to attend the judging event or any of the horse shows. She did though, wish to stay in the club and continue to visit Miller’s barn to care for and show one of her horses (as she did not have one of her own).

Miller thought about it and made some modifications, allowing this member to write a story about her 4-H experience rather than attending a judging event. Over the summer the member quietly worked away getting advice and teachings from her with the rest of the group. Slowly, she began to speak up and ask questions and make comments on her observations. By August, she had built enough confidence to participate in a practice show at Miller’s farm with other youth members and their families, with the only stranger being the judge.

This was a huge success and the young girl agreed to sign up for the smallest show of the season afterwards.

“I told her I would register her and if she got there and didn’t feel comfortable showing, that was alright but she could still help and be part of it,” says Miller.

Once again loving the experience, the member was eager to chat about it afterwards and went on to show at her Achievement Day and read her story about her 4-H experience in front of her peers at the club’s final meeting. 

In 2015, now more confident, she returned to Miller’s barn, attended every show she could and participated in the judging event. 2016 will now be her third year as a 4-H participant.

“The saying goes that you only get out of something what you put into it and in this case, being willing to spend that extra bit of time and think a bit outside the box, continues to make this member’s 4-H experience a very positive thing that will help her throughout her life.”

Haldimand leaders ensure all are included

Written By: Ryan Métivier

In the Haldimand Girl’s Night Out Club members partake in activities based around topics such as skin and hair care, self-esteem, bullying, exercise and fashion. They also enjoy guest speakers on these topics and have a chance to learn how to make homemade body scrubs and face masks and participate in a Zumba class.

Last year, while recovering in the hospital following an accident, one member, Charlotte Huitema, was unable to participate in some of the club’s meetings. Rather than be forced to miss out, the club’s leaders made the extra effort to alter some of the activities and include her from the hospital.

The club is run by leaders Stephanie Huitema and Kaitlynn Young. Huitema was a 4-H member from 2006‑2012 and began volunteering once completing the program and Young began volunteering in 2013.

Kate Young, Stephanie Huitema, Charlotte Huitema

“I decided to become a leader because I loved my time as a member and was so appreciative to all the leaders that I had, that I wanted to be the same type of role model and community volunteer as well,” says Huitema.

“I got involved with 4-H because I felt I could help teach kids and to be able to learn something new from the clubs myself too,” adds Young.

In order to accommodate Charlotte, with internet access and a laptop she was able to follow the PowerPoints and group discussions from her hospital bed, which worked out great so she could sign off when she needed rest. As a senior member, she was able to help define various topics during discussions to the many first-time members and explain to them the structure of 4-H and how different roles work.

“It was really nice to be included in the meetings and being able to participate when the club started,” says Charlotte Huitema. “This gave me the opportunity to ease back into 4-H and not lose a club that I was interested in. The leaders were very supportive in allowing this option for me to participate.”

Both leaders were thrilled to be able to help this member stay a part of the club, have some socialization and assist in her recovery.

Interested in finding out more about 4-H Ontario, or becoming a member or volunteer yourself? Visit our website here to find out more about signing up!